Dating Methods Evolutionary Puzzles Fossils Geological Philosophical Rapid Fossilization Young Earth

SILVER COIN DATED 1744 ENCASED IN STONE

On October 25, 1747 a ship named ‘Reijgersdaal’ sunk off the coast of South Africa. Then in 1979, less than 235 years later, the coin was found encased in solid fossilized rock. Another “puzzle” for the age of the earth and fossilization processes. How can we “know” that any of the fossilized creatures in any museum are actually ancient? Well, we can’t…

On October 25, 1747 a ship named ‘Reijgersdaal’ sunk off the coast of South Africa. Then in 1979, less than 235 years later, the coin was found encased in solid fossilized rock.1

The discovery found coins dating back to the Song Dynasty of China which was from about 960 A.D. to 1279 A.D.. These coins had become fossilized in solid aragonite rock through a fossilization process, which like all the other fossilization processes is thought to take vast eons of time. Here the fossilization process is called lithification.1 Aragonite rock formations are found commonly within sedimentary layers laid down by water or within a body of water.

The date on the coins clearly provide evidence that the fossilization process that encased these coins certainly happened rapidly perhaps over a few hundred years or so. Keep in mind that if these were sea shells found in these rocks then they might be placed in a museum under “ancient fossils” from some “early” sea, but as dated coins (while they might yet be in a museum) they tell a completely different and somewhat uncomfortable story.

1 Untold Secrets of Planet Earth: Flood Fossils, Vance Nelson, Feb 2014 p.67